Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Will You Wish With Us?



By: Kim Evanoski (@CareManage4All)

So I am waking up in the dark and, at the end of the day, driving through the dark finishing the work day; it leads to wanting “wishes” granted for some simple life treats like warm sun light through the car window.

 The act of "wishing" is pretty significant in palliative care, if you really think about it fully. It happens weekly, if not daily, where personal struggles require "wishing".

 Do you have "wishing" happening on your watch?

 In my practice, “wishes” are validated for the sheer empowerment of the act.

 "Wishing" is actually a significant activity. It provides a therapeutic and thoughtful process that I would like to encourage. I think "wishing" is important to all matters human. "Wishing" brings a tremendous amount of open thinking towards improving our internal and external worlds. And in that open thinking, "wishing" should be allowed in statement form with no judgment given whether explained or not. "Wishing" creates thoughts for me of hope, tolerance, insight, creativity, perspective, laughter, wisdom, and fun.

 What does "wishing" create for you?

 As we head into the light of the New Year, let us acknowledge and share our "wishing" as a healthy way to care for ourselves and to care for the world around us.

 Wishing you the comfort of “wishes”.

Photo courtesy of Nancy Lundeberg ©2014

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

A thought provoking essay! When I worked as a hospice RN, I frequently joined patients in "wishing" things were different than they were. Wishing they didn't have a terminal illness; wishing they had completed some important reconciliation or task; wished they had more energy, etc.

The wishing time was valuable in that it let me know what was weighing on the patient's mind and some wishes could be "granted". Reconciliations were accomplished in some cases, letters were written to future grandchildren or kids to be read at specific events and worrisome symptoms could be relieved. At a minimum the patient and family had a hospice team on their side that they knew "wished them well", asked what that meant to THEM and assisted along the journey. Barbara

Margaret Fleming said...

Thank you for this article. A good stimulus for those of us who might think "this is all there is" "this is all I get."
Margaret Fleming