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Geriatrics and Palliative Care Links

We are populating a new list of links for national geriatrics and palliative care organizations (in addition to the blog role that is on our main page).  Let us know if you have other sites that you think should be on this list!

Geriatrics Links
  • American Geriatrics Society: The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) is a not-for-profit organization of health professionals devoted to improving the health, independence and quality of life of all older people.
  • Administration on Aging (AOA): The mission of the Administration on Aging is to help elderly individuals maintain their dignity and independence in their homes and communities through comprehensive, coordinated, and cost effective systems of long-term care, and livable communities across the U.S.
  • American Academy of Home Care Physicians (AAHCP): The American Academy of Home Care Physicians serves the needs of thousands of physicians and related professionals and agencies interested in improving care of patients in the home.
  • American Association of Retired Persons (AARP): AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization that helps people 50 and over improve the quality of their lives. As the nation's largest membership organization for people 50+, AARP is leading a revolution in the way people view and live life after 50.
  • American Association of Homes & Services for the Aging (AAHSA):  AAHSA is comprised of 5,700 member organizations offering the continuum of aging services: adult day services, home health, community services, senior housing, assisted living residences, continuing care retirement communities and nursing homes
  • American Medical Directors Association (AMDA):  a professional association of medical directors, attending physicians, and others practicing in the long term care continuum, dedicated to excellence in patient care and provides education, advocacy, information, and professional development to promote the delivery of quality long term care medicine.
  • American Society on Aging (ASA):  the membership of ASA is a multidisciplinary array of professionals who are concerned with the physical, emotional, social, economic and spiritual aspects of aging.
  • Gerontological Society of America (GSA):  the oldest and largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to research, education, and practice in the field of aging.
  • National Institute on Aging (NIA):  NIA leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of life.
Palliative Care Links
  • American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine:  The American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine is a physician specialty society for hospice and palliative medicine.  The Web site provides information on professional education, board certification, fellowship training, and health policy and advocacy relevant to hospice and palliative medicine.
  • Center to Advance Palliative Care:  The Center to Advance Palliative Care Web site offers a multitude of palliative care resources, tools, training, and technical assistance.
  • Dartmouth Atlas  The Dartmouth Atlas Web site permits creation of customized reports looking at geographic differences in end-of-life care costs and utilization (US).
  • Education for Physicians on End-of-Life Care: The Education for Physicians on End-of-Life Care projects provide tools for educating health care professionals on the essential clinical competencies in palliative care.
  • End-of-life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)\: ELNEC is a national nursing education initiative to improve palliative care. ELNEC is at train-the-trainer project that offers four curricula designed for specific populations; Core, Critical Care, Geriatric and Pediatrics.
  • End-of-Life / Palliative Educationn Resource Center (EPERC): educational resources for the community of health professional educators involved in palliative care education
  • Get Palliative Care.org:  Get Palliative Care.org is a consumer-oriented Web site that defines palliative care and provides links to local resources.
  • Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association:  The Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association is the United States’ largest and oldest professional nursing organization dedicated to promoting excellence in hospice and palliative nursing care.
  • National Consensus Project:  Link to the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care
  • National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization:  The National Hospice and Palliative Organization is a membership organization of hospices that provides educational, organizational, and advocacy resources related to hospice and palliative care.
  • Palliative Doctors:  Public-oriented Web site providing information about and links to palliative care resources
  • Social Work in Hospice and Palliative Care Network:  Links to information, education, training, and research for social workers

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You can also find us on Youtube!


Listen to GeriPal Podcasts on:
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