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Looking for Posts We Love - Palliative Care Grand Rounds Coming Soon


Don't forget that GeriPal is hosting Palliative Care Grand Rounds on Wednesday, October 7th! The goal of Palliative Care Grand Rounds is to put a spotlight on outstanding blog posts from any website with a focus on hospice, palliative care, death, or dying.

So, let us know in the comment section of this post (or the previous post on this subject) if you come across a website with a good article. If you are a blogger, pick one of your favorite posts on your own blog and leave the link in the comment section (shameless self-promotion is ok – part of the goal is to spread the word about the great palliative care community out there on the web).

Comments

Anonymous said…
http://bulletin.aarp.org/yourhealth/policy/articles/end_of_life_counseling_why_it_really_matters.html
Anonymous said…
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gail-austin-cooney-md/debate-misses-point-of-en_b_299063.html
Jan Henderson said…
This post is 10 months old, but I prefer it to more recent things I’ve written. I need to get back to this important subject.
http://www.thehealthculture.com/2008/11/death-be-not-visible.html
Love the carving on the tree. It really is a mutual admiration society. I have some blog posts I need to email to you soon.
Jerry said…
OK, so here's some shameless self-promotion - Where to sit?

As for posts at other sites, there's this.

I think that there are some thoughtful comments along with some foolishness.

I point to the post and thread not because it's particularly informative for people already working in the field, but maybe because it gives an indication of what we often have to work against.
Patrice Villars said…
Jerry, love the shameless promotion. Always good to have another great blog site. Thanks.

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