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How Is it Going?


Hello GeriPal Community!
I have certainly enjoyed reading many of the posts and comments since the launch of GeriPal 4 months ago.

While I think that the website is adding value to my life and my practice in Geriatrics, we (Eric Widera, Alex Smith, and I) would love to know what all of you think of our site!

We are hoping to take a step back to see if we are meeting your needs and whether there are any areas for improvement.

For those of you who have not yet filled out the surgey we sent through email (or if you dont get emails from us), we are asking for 3 minutes of your time to fill out a very brief survey.
Here is a link to the survey:
www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=V_2fZ9r_2fibPcoR1yUp8SCwQQ_3d_3d

Your continued support in building GeriPal is greatly appreciated.
Thanks!

Comments

Jan Henderson said…
I mentioned in my survey that I'd be writing a post about GeriPal. It's called "Were 'death panels' a teachable moment for palliative care?"

Here's a link:

http://www.thehealthculture.com/2009/10/were-death-panels-a-teachable-moment-for-palliativ.html

(And here's a TinyURL version of the link: http://tinyurl.com/yzgpmlh .)

It ends with a discussion of the Ivan Ilyich post and refers to another recent Lancet essay which "cites Steven Hsi's memoir, Closing the Chart. 'Despite the compassionate care he received, Hsi was most troubled by his physicians' failure to ask the crucial questions: 'What has this disease done to your life? What has it done to your family? What has it done to your work? What has it done to your spirit?' As suggested by Hsi, physicians faced with questions of unexplained suffering and death are loathe to ask existential questions that have no biomedical answer.'

GeriPal is a blog that's not afraid to ask the existential questions."
Jerry said…
Hi, Carla, et al:

You ask, "Howzit going?" I think you're doing pretty good.

This is still somewhat uncharted territory, so the rules get made up as we go along.

And there's plenty of room for the many different takes on the same general topic.

Personally, I find your overall highlights and comments on what's up in the literature to be very helpful.

Many thanks.

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