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Making Our Voices Heard: A Year in Review


It has been 6 months since the start of this little experiment called GeriPal. I must admit, initially I had a lot of questions about the viability of a blog about geriatrics and palliative care. Did it really make sense to combine the topics of geriatrics and palliative care in one blog? Would anyone notice the blog? Would anyone care?

The good news is that the answer to all these questions appears to be a resounding yes. The interest and attention that GeriPal has received has been extraordinary given that we have been around for such a short amount of time. A vibrant community has developed that has brought people together to talk about common challenges that we share in our day to day work. Much like what makes both geriatrics and palliative care special, this community is interdisciplinary to the core. Just take a look at the top 3 most commented posts for 2009 for a good example of who posts and who comments:
  1. A Rant on Terminology – by Patrice Villars (a nurse practitioner)
  2. Notes From the Field – by Anne Johnson (a social worker)
  3. GeriPal Taste Test Part I: Liquid Bowel Medications – by Ken Covinsky, Alex Smith, and Eric Widera (3 physicians)
What can you do to continue to foster this discussion within this interdisciplinary community? Probably the most important thing is to just join the discussion. This can be as simple as leaving a comment on a post that you find interesting. 

Thanks again for a great 2009.  I'll leave you all with the Top 10 Most Viewed Posts of the last year.
  1. Does Morphine Stimulate Cancer Growth?
  2. A Rant on Terminology
  3. End Stage Dementia: A Terminal Disease Needing Palliative Care
  4. GeriPal Taste Test Part I: Liquid Bowel Medications
  5. Notes From the Field
  6. Overuse of Pain Medications in Hospice and Palliative Medicine
  7. Inappropriate Medications in the Hospice Setting
  8. On teaching EKG's and family meetings
  9. Hospice care of the Geriatric patient
  10. Some Other Disease: A Call to Action

Comments

Dan Matlock said…
I've really enjoyed the discussions and thanks for hosting this blog. You guys did a survey several months ago regarding what folks wanted from geripal, were you ever going to share those results?
Dan Matlock said…
Oh, I like the pictures as well.
Ann said…
Congratulations on a successful, informative, enjoyable first six months. And many more! Ann
Patrice Villars said…
This is the most informative and often delightful site for improving my practice. Hands down, GeriPal gets my Golden Globe vote (or whatever the blog award equivalent) for best blog pictures! Where do you get all those great illustrations? Congrats.
Eric Widera said…
We are hoping to present our survey results at AGS this year (cross your fingers) and to post them on geripal later on. We changed a lot of things on the website based on the survey - hopefully making a more enjoyable read. One comment told us to jazz up the site a little bit so we added all those pictures. Which leads to the question: where do we get the pictures? Answer: the intertubes and a little bit of photoshoping.
Great first 6 months guys - a fine addition to the intertubes. --Drew from Pallimed.
I agree with Drew, a wonderful addition to the blogosphere.Thanks for keeping things fresh and bringing many new voices. I am glad to see such a great community evolve around GeriPal and love that you are being innovative with posts like The Taste Test.

Keep up the good work!
Jerry said…
Why do I keep hearing a song lyric in my head - "Another day older and deeper in debt?"

PS - the correct spelling of the word is 'innertoobz.' More on that later ;^)

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