Skip to main content

Social Media in Palliative Care Communities: A New Workshop at the AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly

A new workshop on the usage of online social media has been added to the AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly this March. The session, titled "Social Media in Palliative Care Communities: Developing and Maintaining your Online Presence", will be led by a panel of bloggers from GeriPal and Pallimed and will take place on  Friday March 5th, 7-8:15am (I know, it's early, but it's nothing that a double expresso can't fix). 

The goal of the workshop is to bring people together interested in using social media to advance the field of Hospice and Palliative Care.  The great thing about setting up a workshop like this is that we get to take advantage of the resources that these online networks give us in developing the actual content. One of these tools is a brief survey that Christian Sinclair created to get an understanding of what potential attendees may want from such a session.   So take 3 minutes of your time and either fill out the survey or post comments here or at Pallimed on topics that may motivate you to wake up at 7am on Friday.

-----------------------------------
Here is the abstract for the session:
-----------------------------------
Social Media in Palliative Care Communities: Developing and Maintaining your Online Presence.

Time: Friday March 5th, 7-8:15am

Panel:
Amy Clarkson, MD, Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care, Kansas City, MO (Pallimed)
Christian Sinclair, MD, FAAHPM, Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care, Kansas City, MO (Pallimed)
Alexander Smith, MD, UC San Francisco (GeriPal)
Eric Widera, MD, UC San Francisco (GeriPal)
Amber Wollesen, MD, Saint Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, MO (Pallimed)

Abstract:
In this session, the panel will present the various social media platforms where palliative care information is being created, commented on, and shared. Understanding the importance of social media to hospice and palliative care as a field is helpful in spreading information consistent with our professional values, dispelling myths, and educating professionals in addition to patients and families. We will present successful examples of palliative care in social media from the perspective on the individual as well as the larger community. Despite the opportunities, there are concerns about privacy, time commitment, and legal risks which will also be addressed. The session will not go into detail on the 'how-to' aspects of specific social media platforms. The initial presentation will be approximately 30-40 minutes with plenty of time for discussion with the audience and panel.

Comments

Jerry said…
Sweet.

Make mine a quadruple-shot.
Anonymous said…
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
karen gossage said…
great idea to disseminate info to busy healthcare professionals and those interested in eolc I will be at the conference and hope to see you there
Patrice Villars said…
Let's see, that's 4 am Pacific time. Downright cruel. Of course, I'll be there!
Dan Matlock said…
Huge congrats! I won't be at AAHPM thios year but I am very sorry to miss this.
Anonymous said…
Hi,

Can you tell me - is this session going to be online?

Kathy
Eric Widera said…
Great question Kathy. This is why I love comments on our site as you sometimes get that "ah-ha" moment. I don't think we can do get an online session in place this time around but in the future having some type of live online event would be pretty exciting. We are planning to post about the session afterwards.

Popular posts from this blog

Dying without Dialysis

There is a terrific article in this weeks Journal of Pain and Symptom Management by Fliss Murtagh of King's College in London about the epidemiology of symptoms for patients with advanced renal failure who die without dialysis.  This study is important because while we know that patients with advanced renal failure have a limited life expectancy and the average age of initiation of hemodialysis is increasing, we know little about the alternatives to hemodialysis.  Specifically, we know nothing about symptoms affecting quality of life among patients who elect not to start dialysis (so called "conservative management" - is this the best label?).  This article provides a terrific counterpoint to the article in last years NEJM showing that nursing home residents who initiated hemodialysis tended to die and decline in function (see GeriPal write up here). 

The study authors followed patients with the most advanced form of chronic kidney disease (the new name for renal failu…

The Dangers of Fleet Enemas

The dangers of oral sodium phosphate preparations are fairly well known in the medical community. In 2006 the FDA issued it’s first warning that patients taking oral sodium phosphate preparations are at risk for potential for acute kidney injury. Two years later, over-the-counter preparations of these drugs were voluntarily withdrawn by the manufacturers.  Those agents still available by prescription were given black box warnings mainly due to acute phosphate nephropathy that can result in renal failure, especially in older adults. Despite all this talk of oral preparations, little was mentioned about a sodium phosphate preparation that is still available over-the-counter – the Fleet enema.

Why Oral Sodium Phosphate Preparations Are Dangerous 

Before we go into the risks of Fleet enemas, lets spend just a couple sentences on why oral sodium phosphate preparations carry significant risks. First, oral sodium phosphate preparations can cause significant fluid shifts within the colon …

Does “compassionate deception” have a place in palliative care?

by: Olivia Gamboa (@Liv_g_g)

There is broad consensus in the medical community that lying to patients is unethical.  However, in the care of patients with dementia, the moral clarity of this approach blurs.  In her recent New Yorker article, “The Memory House,”  Larissa MacFarquhar provides an excellent portrait of the common devices of artifice, omission and outright deception that are frequently deployed in the care of patients with dementia.  She furthermore explores the historical and ethical underpinnings of the various approaches used in disclosing (or not) information to patients living with dementia.

Ms. MacFarquhar introduces the idea of “compassionate deception,” or the concept that withholding truths, or even promoting outright falsehoods, is a reasonable and even ethical choice for those caring for patients with dementia.  To the extent that it helps a person with dementia feel happier and calmer, allowing them to believe in a gentler reality (one in which, say, their spo…