Skip to main content

Stimulating Interest in a Career in Geriatrics - The Scholarship Award Summit


Photo by: DGies / Flickr

When the clock strikes midnight on January 1st, the very oldest of the baby boomers will turn 65 years of age. Every hour thereafter another the equivalent of a Boeing 747 airplane full of baby boomers will be turning 65. By 2030, the US will have effectively doubled the population who are older than 65 to an estimated 71 million individuals.

It is imperative that we think about novel approaches to increase the numbers of practicing geriatricians given this dramatic change in our population demographics. The John A. Hartford Foundation has led the way in promoting models to increase recruitment in advanced fellowships by targeting a wide range of learners. Among these models include those focused on residents, such as the Geriatrics Is Your Future Program at Baylor College of Medicine, and the Annual Resident Award Summit at the Southeast Center of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine.

Building upon these programs, the UCSF Division of Geriatrics just announced the first annual Geriatrics Scholarship Award Summit open to ACGME interns and residents in Internal Medicine or Family Medicine from across the US. The goal of the Award is to stimulate interest in a career in academic geriatrics by recognizing residents’ scholarly or research achievements in aging or geriatrics. Each award carries with it a cash prize of $500 plus a stipend to cover travel and lodging in San Francisco to present their work at a special award summit.

More information about the Geriatrics Scholarship Award Summit can be found at UCSF’s Division of Geriatrics Website.   This is an exceptional oppurtunity for interns and residents, so please forward this on!

by: Eric Widera

Comments

Carol said…
What about nurses (RNs and advance practice nurses)? Hmmm...

Popular posts from this blog

Nowhere Else to Be

The following story is by Jennifer Heidmann, MD, FACP. She is the Medical Director of Redwood Coast PACE in Eureka, CA, as well as a physician for Hospice of Humboldt and a hospitalist at St Joseph Hospital.

Managing Behavioral Symptoms in Dementia: Podcast with Helen Kales

In this week's podcast we talk with Helen Kales, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan the VA Center for Clinical Management and Research. 

We've spent a great deal of effort in Geriatrics describing what we shouldn't do to address behavioral symptoms in dementia: physical restraints, antipsychotics, sedating antidepressants.  Helen Kales was lecturing around the country about all of these things we shouldn't do a few years back, and people would raise their hands and ask, "Well, what should we do?" She realized she needed to give caregivers tools to help.

Churning Patients Through the End of Life: A Podcast with Joan Teno

On this weeks podcast, we interview Dr. Joan Teno about her recently published study in JAMA titled "Site of Death, Place of Care, and Health Care Transitions Among US Medicare Beneficiaries, 2000-2015."

In 2013, Dr. Teno published a study that showed how good our health care system in the US promotes patient churn. Despite positive signs of more hospice use and decreased deaths in the hospital, Dr. Teno found the from 2000 to 2009 we "churned" patients through more ICU visits, more hospitalizations, and more late transitions that are burdensome to dying persons in their family. Dr. Teno's latest study shows us how we are doing now, extending that work to 2015 and now including Medicare Advantage (MA) plans.