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Phoenix Rising: Geriatrics & Palliative Care Sessions at SGIM




For those on the fence about whether to attend the 2011 Society for Internal Medicine Meeting in Phoenix, or for attendees who want to be in the know......

Here is a list of all of the exciting geriatrics and palliative care-related programs and sessions happening at SGIM this year.

If you know of other geriatrics or palliative care-related presentations, posters, or workshops please share them with the group by commenting below.

See you there!


THURSDAY

  • 10:30 to noon: Session WA04 Workshop, Transitions in Care for Vulnerable Populations: One Size Does Not Fit All. Location: Paradise Valley 2nd floor

  • 10:30 to noon: Abstracts A2, Geriatrics Oral Abstract Session. Location: Ahwatukee B Room, Second Floor
    • Lee Lindquist: Seniors Unnecessarily Complicate their Home Medication regimens post discharge 
    • Lee Lindquist: Hiring and Training Processes of Agencies Supplying Paid Caregivers to Older Adults
    • Sangeeta Ahluwalia: Missed Opportunities for Advance Care Planning in Primary Care
    • Alex Smith: Factors Influencing Quality of Life in Late Life Disability
    • Erik Fromme: DNR does not mean do not treat: Data from the first US Electronic POLST Registry

  • 11:15 to 11:30: Health Disparities Oral Abstracts Session:
    • Brie Williams: The Mortality Risk for Older Adults Released from Prison

  • 12:30 to 1:30: Seth Landefeld Distinguished Professor in Geriatrics Keynote Lecture. “Health Care in the Aging Century: New Directions for Doctors, Health Systems, and Public Policy.”
    • Co-sponsored by the SGIM Geriatrics Task Force, the Ethics Committee and Interest Group, The Health Policy Committee, and the Quality and Safety Improvement Interest Group.  Location: Phoenix D 3rd floor

  • 2:00 to 3:30pm: Session WB01 Workshop, To Screen or Not to Screen: Preventative Care of Frail Elders in an Era of Patient Centeredness and Pay for Performance. Location: Maryvale A 2nd floor

  • 2:00 to 2:30pm: Poster Session B - Innovations in Medical Education Submissions 
    • Brook Calton, MD, Adam Moylan, MD, Eric Widera, MD: A Required, Short Palliative Care Rotation for First-Year Internal Medicine Residents

  • 2:45 to 3:00pm: Oral Abstract Session
    • Kala Mehta, DSc, MPH: A Clinical Risk Index for Long Term Survival of Hospitalized Older Patien

  • 4:00 to 5:30pm: Session WC01 Workshop, Developing a Research Agenda in Geriatrics Clinical Care and Practice Reform. Location: Maryvale A 2nd floor

  • 4:00 to 5:30pm: Session WC08 Worskhop, Twitter to Tenure: Using Social Media to Enhance your Career. Presented by Eric Widera, MD, and Alex Smith, MD, MS, MPH

  • 5:30pm to 7:00pm: Poster Session 2 – Geriatrics Posters presented during this poster session. Location: Phoenix A/B/C 3rd floor
    •  Mike Steinman, MD: Patient Age, Comorbid Burden, and the Usefulness of Heart Failure Guidelines
    • Brie Williams, MD: Confined to Ignorance:  The Absence of Prisoners from National Health Data
    • Brie Williams, MD, Vivien Sun, MD, and Cyrus Ahalt, MA: How Safe is Your Neighborhood?  Perceived Neighborhood Safety and Functional Decline in Older Adults


FRIDAY, MAY 6th

  • 7:00am to 8:30 am: Walking Abstract Poster Session/Meet the Professor Session

  • 7:30am to 8:00 am: IF04 End of Life Interest Group. Location Alhambra 2nd Floor

  • 7:30am to 8:00 am: IF07 House Calls Interest Group. Location Estrella 2nd floor

  • 8:30am:   Seth Landefeld receives the SGIM Glaser Award during the morning plenary session. Location: Valley of the Sun 2nd floor

  • 11:00 to 11:15am: Oral Abstract Session
    • Katherine Aragon, MD, Alex Smith: Medicare Post-Hospitalization Skilled Nursing Benefit in the Last Six Months of Life

  • 2:00pm to 2:45pm: CUE1 Clinical Update: Update in Palliative Medicine. Location: Phoenix D 3rd floor

  • 2:45pm to 3:30pm: CUE2 Clinical Update: Update in Geriatric Medicine. Location: Phoenix D 3rd floor

  • 4:00pm to 5:30pm: WF01 Workshop: Ambulatory Care for the Older Adult. Location: Encanto B 2nd floor

  • 4:00 to 5:30pm: WF09: Workshop: Secondary Data Analysis R01s:  A Roadmap for success, presented by Kenneth Covinsky, MD, MPH

 SATURDAY, MAY 7th

  •  7:30 to 8:30: IS09 Geriatrics Interest Group. Location: Camelback B 2nd floor

  • 8:45 to 9:00 am: Plenary Session
o    Celia Yau, MD, Sei Lee: Glycemic Control and Functional Decline in Frail Elders with Diabetes Mellitus


by: Rebecca Sudore

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