Skip to main content

What's in a name? How do you explain "palliative care"?

It's July, and that means teaching new fellows how to explain palliative care to patients and family members.  For inpatient consults, that means we usually we introduce our names, say we're from palliative care, and then ask if we can sit down.  At that point the patient or family - eyebrows raised - says, "Who are you again? You say you're from palliative, what is that?"

A recent national survey commission by the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) suggests that three-quarters of the lay public don't know what the term palliative care means.  We have much explaining to do.

Here's what I say, and teach fellows to say:
Palliative care is care for patients with serious illness, like yourself.  We focus on three things:
1. Symptoms.  Patients with serious illness often have symptoms like pain, shortness of breath, nausea, constipation, lack of energy, depression, anxiety, nausea, or difficulty sleeping.  We are experts in the treatment of those symptoms.  (patients usually say, "I've had some of those!").
2. Communication.  The hospital is a busy place.  Patients with serious ilness often have many doctors from different teams coming in and out of the picture.  We help with communication to make sure that the treatments you receive match your goals. (slowly, with emphasis - patients and family usually nod)
3. Finding the right services outside the hospita (for patients who might leave the hospital).  We help make sure that you have a smooth transition once you leave the hospital.  We make sure you are set up with the right services - one service we often refer to is hospice.  Another is our outpatient palliative care clinic.
For patients who have less cognitive ability, either due to delirium or dementia, I might say: "We help people with serious illness with symptoms like pain, communication with your family and your doctors, and referral to services like hospice."

Or there is the super short version the fellow I worked with came up with spontaneously, "We're the palliative care team, think of us as Pal's for people with serious illness."

The version CAPC research demonstrated to have the best rating/positive impact was:


Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. This type of care is focused on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, and stress of a serious illness - whatever the diagnosis.
The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family. Palliative care is provided by a team of doctors, nurses, and other specialists who work with a patient's other doctors to provide an extra layer of support. Palliative care is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness, and can be provided together with curative treatment.
I like this version.  It reminds me that my definition doesn't mention the team aspect of palliative care, or the fact that palliative care can be deliviered at any stage in a seriours illness.  On the other hand, I think the words I use benefit from being more concrete -- in terms of immediately relating to the patient and family how we can help them.  I also find it easier to remember my 3 things than this script.

But I'm open to new things.  I'll have to "try on" these new words next time I'm on service.

How do you explain Palliative Care?  For those of you practicing Geriatrics, do you find you need to explain Geriatrics?  My guess is no.

by: Alex Smith

Comments

Earl Quijada said…
I like the 3 points - concrete, relatable, clearly helpful. Nice. Thanks.
VNSNY said…
Pediatric nurse for the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, Sandra McTernan wrote a heartbreaking piece about a baby with a rare disease. And while we often don't want to think about babies and death in the same sentence, she writes: "Palliative care in the home is not for every family but for this family it made it possible to spend the precious little time they had with their baby in a comfort of home."
http://blogs.vnsny.org/2011/07/19/infants-and-palliative-care/
Cathy C. Schubert, MD said…
Actually, I have to explain what Geriatrics is to almost every patient I see. While there is often a son or daughter sitting next to the bed or exam table nodding his/her head enthusiastically during my introduction, most of my older adults have never heard of a geriatrician.
Alex Smith said…
Thanks Earl, glad you like these words. I have to credit David Giansircusa for teaching me the original "3 things" when I was a palliative care fellow.

Cathy - interesting that you have to explain Geriatrics! I wonder if anyone has doen similar research to CAPC's study on the lay public's familiarity and sense of meaning of the word "Geriatrics".
I wrote on this in my blog for the huffington post. Here is the link - http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rev-martha-r-jacobs/thanks-to-dr-jack-kevorki_b_877357.html I heard from many people that they found it helpful to them and they forwarded it to others whom they knew would find it helpful.
Alex, thanks for your post. At HealthCare Chaplaincy, we've adopted the new definition recommended by CAPC and have added this point: "Palliative care treats the whole person – body, mind, and spirit.” At times we use this short statement: “Palliative care improves the quality of life of patients with a serious or chronic illness and their families, matches treatment to the patient’s values and goals, reduces suffering, and treats the whole person – body, mind, and spirit."
Kath said…
Hello! Great blog, and great title for your blog site! We need some serious "cross-pollination" between the geriatric and the hospice palliative care communities.

Re the topic of introducing oneself, on occasion HPC consultants are asked to NOT tell who they are, and where they come from, because "the person is not ready". I believe that wearing our name tags identifying that we are from a HPC team,is partly an intervention in itself and helps people move one step further on the path to being able to talk about and investigate what it is that we can offer.

In addition to the topics above, I was mentioning the other day, one of my favorite ways to respond to people when they say, "The doctor says there is nothing more they can do for me". I love to introduce HPC by saying, "When the doctor says that there is nothing more to do for you, that is when Hospice Palliative Care team says, "We have only just begun!"" And then I explain some of the concepts that you have talked about.

Thanks for your blog!
Kath
Anonymous said…
Hi,
I start by introducing myself as a nurse who works with pt's who have chronic illness, treatable but not curable. (Then give their dx as an example). Explain how my program supports, educates and helps their doctor manage illness/symptoms. By then they are interested, then I throw "Palliative Care" in there and explain. Otherwise they often are so distracted by PALLIATIVE, that they don't hear what it is I have to offer. 6 years, so far, it works great for me.

Popular posts from this blog

Lost in Translation: Google’s Translation of Palliative Care to ‘Do-Nothing Care’

by: Cynthia X. Pan, MD, FACP, AGSF (@Cxpan5X)

My colleagues often ask me: “Why are Chinese patients so resistant to hospice and palliative care?” “Why are they so unrealistic?” “Don’t they understand that death is part of life?” “Is it true that with Chinese patients you cannot discuss advance directives?”

As a Chinese speaking geriatrician and palliative care physician practicing in Flushing, NY, I have cared for countless Chinese patients with serious illnesses or at end of life.  Invariably, when Chinese patients or families see me, they ask me if I speak Chinese. When I reply “I do” in Mandarin, the relief and instant trust I see on their faces make my day meaningful and worthwhile.

At my hospital, the patient population is about 30% Asian, with the majority of these being Chinese. Most of these patients require language interpretation.  It becomes an interesting challenge and opportunity, as we often need to discuss advance directives, goals of care, and end of life care options…

Delirium: A podcast with Sharon Inouye

In this week's GeriPal podcast we discuss delirium, with a focus on prevention. We are joined by internationally acclaimed delirium researcher Sharon Inouye, MD, MPH. Dr Inouye is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Aging Brain Center in the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife.

Dr. Inouye's research focuses on delirium and functional decline in hospitalized older patients, resulting in more than 200 peer-reviewed original articles to date. She has developed and validated a widely used tool to identify delirium called the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), and she founded the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) to prevent delirium in hospitalized patients.

We are also joined by guest host Lindsey Haddock, MD, a geriatrics fellow at UCSF who asks a great question about how to implement a HELP program, or aspects of the program, in a hospital with limited resources.  


You can also find us on Youtube!


Listen to GeriPal Podcasts on:
iTunes…

Are Palliative Care Providers Better Prognosticators? A Podcast with Bob Gramling

Estimating prognosis is hard and clinicians get very little training on how to do it.  Maybe that is one of the reasons that clinicians are more likely to be optimistic and tend to overestimate patient survival by a factor of between 3 and 5.  The question is, aren't we better as palliative care clinicians than others in estimating prognosis?  This is part of our training and we do it daily.   We got to be better, right? 

Well, on todays podcast we have Bob Gramling from the Holly and Bob Miller Chair of Palliative Medicine at the University of Vermont to talk about his paper in Journal of Pain and Symptom Management (JPSM) titled “Palliative Care Clinician Overestimation of Survival in Advanced Cancer: Disparities and Association with End of Life Care”.

Big findings from this JPSM paper include that we, like all other clinicians, are an optimistic bunch and that it actually does impact outcomes.   In particular, the people whose survival was overestimated by a palliative care c…