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Rant: "Hospice and Palliative Medicine" Not Listed

Quick one here (a little too long for a tweet).  I've been filling out re-credentialing at the hospital, and was asked to list my primary specialty (internal medicine) and subspecialty.  Hospice and Palliative Medicine was not listed as a subspecialty option.  I selected "other" and then typed it in.

I don't think I've ever seen Hospice and Palliative Medicine listed in any of the many credentialing processes I've been through.  For that matter, when signing up to review for a journal, or for a medical conference, they often ask for subspecialty.  I can't recall (other than AAHPM) that Hospice and Palliative Medicine has ever been listed.

It's been 4 years now since the American Board of Medical Specialties recognized Hospice and Palliative Medicine as a subspecialty, isn't it about time we were added to these lists?  I think we've outgrown "other".

by: Alex Smith

Comments

Ron Crossno said…
I've seen it listed in several venues, but almost always this only occurs after someone advocates to get it listed. Why would they change unless someone calls their hand on it. Politely point out that it is an ABMS and AOA/BOS recognized specialty and you would like them to update their application. So far, that's always worked for me.

Ron Crossno
Alex Smith said…
Good point Ron. I work in the VA national system, so perhaps if others working at VA's join the chorus this will happen.
Gregg V said…
I agree with Ron ... our hospital has Palliative Med privileges, but only after we lobbied for them. We've also networked to share model privileges across our five state hospital system, an approach that will be necessary for a national system like the VA.
Gregg VandeKieft
care funding said…
I do so agree that the Hospice and Palliative Medicine field should be taken into consideration. It's been a long time since its existence, might as well acknowledge it.
Anonymous said…
Looks like they still consider hospice services as a "non-medical" specialization. Bad.
Flint Ross said…
That's not going to help the medical industry if they can't even seem to recognize palliative care as one of their own. If they can't seem to put that in their record books, how can people trust them to take care of the sick?

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