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GeriPal Turns 3: The Training Wheels Come off



Today is GeriPal's third birthday.  This news may bring welcome relief to some of our readers as we have finally moved beyond the Terrible Twos.  However, be forewarned, the training wheels are coming off this year.   So, expect a lot more of the same content that has made this last year so fun to recap in this post.

Highlights from the Last Year

There was a lot of memorable moments this last year, however the following are the ones that really stand out for me:
  • Jim Cleary used a GeriPal post as a reason why Palliative Medicine should embrace social media in the journal Palliative Medicine
  • GeriPal and Pallimed had another successful year at AAHPM, with Blogs to Boards session and the ever so fun GeriPal/Pallimed party.


Top 10 New Posts of the Year

Length of Stay in Nursing Homes at the End of Life and End Stage Dementia: A Terminal Disease Needing Palliative Care were the most frequently viewed posts of the last year even though the first was written in 2010 and the second in 2009.  There is plenty of love to go around to some of our newer content with about 50,000 pageviews a month plus an additional 1700 readers who receive our posts by email.  Here is a recap of the top 10 NEW posts of the year:
  1. When Surrogates Override the DNR: A Terrific Geriatrics and Palliative Care Teaching Video
  2. The Dangers of Fleet Enemas
  3. Being Accused of Murder
  4. A Study of Dignity Therapy on Distress and the End-of-Life Experience
  5. What Drugs Should You Avoid In the Elderly: An Update on the Beers Criteria
  6. Death of the Gerontological Nurse Practitioner: Part 1 of 2 
  7. MMSE and Copyrights Part II: Is the MMSE Derivative of Some Other Work?
  8. Decisions on Feeding Tubes in Advanced Dementia
  9. Final Chapter: Californians' Attitudes and Experiences with Death and Dying
  10. Advance directives reduce end-of-life costs in New York and Los Angeles


The Future is Bright

So what do we have in store for next year?  We can't give away all our secrets but if this picture tells you anything, it should be that it's going to be an interesting year...



by: Eric Widera (@ewidera)

Comments

Congratulations! GeriPal is a vital voice educating professionals and the public on what we all really want health care to be. Keep growing.

P.S. Will there be cake?
Moonracer said…
Happy Birthday! Looking forward to watching GeriPal continue to grow in reach and influence in this upcoming year. Nancy
Paula Span, the New Old Age, nytimes.com said…
Mazel tov, youse guys.
Alex Smith said…
Chris - there may not be cake, but there may be...earwax???
Congratulations and Happy Birthday!
Glad to see, both from an injury-prevention and a spectator-excitement perspective, that helmets are in use!
Patrice Villars said…
Many happy returns of the day and years to come!

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