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Pew Reports on Family Caregivers Being Online


Collaborating with caregivers is often an essential part of a geriatrician's work, so I was thrilled to see that this month the Pew Internet & American Life Project has released a report on "Family Caregivers Online".

The report is based on a Pew telephone survey of 3001 adults, conducted in August-September of 2010. Among the respondents, 24% were providing care for another adult. The introduction to the report states that:

"Eight in ten caregivers (79%) have access to the internet. Of those, 88% look online for health information, outpacing other internet users on every health topic included in our survey, from looking up certain treatments to hospital ratings to end-of-life decisions."

The survey also found that caregivers were particularly likely to engage in social activities online, such as using social networking sites, or even writing reviews of clinicians and medical facilities.

My guess is that this information will not come as a surprise to most of us, given that we are all seeing patients and families come in with information gleaned from the web. Furthermore, given the warp speed with which Facebook and other forms of social media are engulfing Americans, it's likely that a survey done today would find even more e-caregiver engagement than there was two years ago.

Still, it's exciting that Pew has published a report highlighting family caregivers, and their use of internet resources to find information and support. Family members and other informal caregivers have often been referred to as the "bedrock" or "backbone" of long-term care, yet as we know our society doesn't currently provide them with nearly enough support to do the work they do. Hopefully this report will help spur even more interest in using internet tools to support caregivers. 

by: Leslie Kernisan

Comments

Anonymous said…
As family caregivers continues to use & depend on the web for health, medical, wellness information, they also need to verify & communicate with their healthcare providers - physicians, pharmacist, nurses prior to implementing any action esp as pertains to medications & diagnosing themselves or their loved ones. CareNovate, LLC is addressing this particular issue by educating & empowering caregivers to use online resources appropriately. Join us on August 14th 8pm CDT for a Twitter Chat for Caregivers & Healthcare professionals discussing "Swimming in the Maze! Online Health info, Apps & Saving on Prescriptions."
Virtual Event http://www.tweetchat.com/room/carerx.
Follow us @carenovate @goldina2. Use Hashtag #carerx.
Please RSVP here http://www.smore.com/mnnr-save-the-date-august-14th-8pm-cdt?ref=my & post in the comment section if you any specific questions: Join us here http://www.tweetchat.com/room/carerx.
Michael Jones said…
I salute every caregivers out there because even after hours of care their love for their patients cannot be compared to anything, it is unmeasurable.
^Thank you Michael Jones! As caregivers, we really need to be patient and give our patients the attention and comfort they need.

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