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Good Luck on the Hospice and Palliative Medicine Boards!!!


We just want to wish good luck to all those taking the 2012 Hospice and Palliative care board exams today and tomorrow.  We know you'll rock the test! 

We also want to say thanks for taking the time to read through the Blogs 2 Boards questions developed by GeriPal and Pallimed.  We have had nearly 11,000 views of the Blogs 2 Boards webpage and plenty of more hits to the other Blogs 2 Board posts.  

If you have any feedback on how we can make the questions better for the next round of tests, please feel free to email me.

Thanks and good luck!

by: Eric and the rest of the blogs to boards team.





Comments

Anonymous said…
Thank you so much for the Blogs 2 Boards series. I found it very helpful. I feel that the blogs 2 boards questions were clinical and logical while a lot of the actual exam questions were touchy feely and open to interpretation. They need to do a better job of reducing ambiguity in their questions. You guys on the other hand, did us a great service!
Anonymous said…
I agree on both points.
Blogs to boards a good resource.
The exam has a long way to go to make it an objective measure of the palliative medicine body of knowledge. Maybe it just reflects how far the specialty needs to go in research etc...
Was surprised by the shear number of pediatric questions. It does not really reflect the setting where the overwhelming majority of us pratice.
Anonymous said…
Did the boards yesterday. There were many pediatric questions anybody has any ides as why is that? Children census is extremely low in Hospice reflecting the general death rate nation wide...
Anonymous said…
How do you write an exam when there is no evidence? Check out the ABIM palliative medicine boards.
Anonymous said…
I thought the board exam was terribly unreflective of the work done in palliative care, at least on our busy service at an academic medical center. I would say more than half the content had nothing to do with my work. Many questions were terribly written and ambiguous. Content was far too heavy around pediatrics as the others stated. Also content is very heavy on bereavement and grief.

Lastly it seems like in palliative care we stress the importance of teamwork and that the physician does not always need to be the team leader, yet the board content seemed to indicate we have to have expertise in aspects of care that would be provided by other disciplines in the team.
Humaira said…
Many of us do not pay attention to these bad elements and not taking good care of our health. We have to remember that our health & physical and mental well being is the mirror of our personality, so we have to take very good care of our health to live a healthy and happy life. Online Amiodarone
Anonymous said…
I passed! Good luck to others. Was a brutal exam.

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