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Evidence-Based Practice of Palliative Medicine



I just got my hands on a copy of a fabulous new book by Drs Goldstein and Morrison and felt compelled to write a quick review about it.  The title of the book is "Evidence-Based Practice of Palliative Medicine" and it's 528 pages is chock-full of useful palliative care topics.

The most interesting aspect of the new book is the chapter format. The editors put together what can be best described as a detailed FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) on palliative medicine. There are 81 questions that are addressed in depth in the corresponding chapters.  Some of my favorite questions from the book include:

Symptom Management Section:
  • How should patient-controlled analgesia be used in patients with serious illness and those experiencing post-op pain?
  • Which opioids are safest and most effective in renal failure? 
  • How should methadone be started and titrated in opioid-na├»ve and opioid-tolerant patients? 
  • When should corticosteroids be used to manage pain? 
  • When should radiopharmaceuticals be considered for pain management? 
  • What nonopioid treatments should be used to manage dyspnea associated with COPD? 
  • What interventions are effective for relieving acute bowel obstruction in cancer and other conditions? 
  • What treatments are effective for anxiety in patients with serious illness?

Communication Section: 
  • What is a useful strategy for estimating survival for persons with advanced non-cancer related illness in palliative care settings? 
  • What do palliative care clinicians need to know about teaching communication?

Disease Specific Topics
  • What special considerations are needed for treatments patients with chronic liver disease? 
  • What special considerations are needs for individuals with ALS, MS, or Parkinson Disease? 
  • How is the patients who stops dialysis best managed? 
  • Which patients with end-stage renal disease should not be started on dialysis?

Special Topics 
  • What techniques can be used in the hospital or home setting to best manage uncontrolled bleeding? 
  • What can be done to improve outcomes for caregivers of patients with serious illness? 
  • How can palliative care be integrated into home-based primary care programs?

The other nice thing about this book is that it is pretty easy to access all the chapters online via the publishers web-portal www.expertconsult.com.

If you want to take a closer look at the book, you can find it on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

By: Eric Widera (@ewidera)

Disclosure: I was an author on 2 chapters in this book, but I have not received, nor will receive, any royalties except for a copy of the book (I have though requested it be autographed by Sean and Nate).  

Comments

Unknown said…
This comment has been removed by the author.
Isaac Vielma said…
Best quick review of 528 pages I've ever seen! I'll be buying my copy, thank you for the review.
Anonymous said…
Thank you so much for posting this! I am going to go out and get it :)
Anonymous said…
Thanks for the heads up!
Barbara said…
Has anyone downloaded this to an IPad yet? I am curious about how readable it is in that format. I've purchased technical books before that were so difficult to read even with enlarging the text.
I have been reading and using the book the past month and strongly endorse it. It is organized by chapters that each address a common palliative care question followed by answers with up to date literature references. Very practical and useful.
Jim Richardson said…
I just got my copy. I've only had time to read about a few topics, but have found it to be very useful and accessible. I have found a typo though. Can you tell me how to contact the authors? Thanks!
Eric Widera said…
Their contact information can be found on the Mount Sinai website. That's probably the best way.
Anonymous said…
The write up is nice. Not surprising that the book has typos. This write up has several typos as well... including the disclosure statement which is apparently missing the word not...

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