Skip to main content

Is it better to look good or feel good?

Shoes modeled by famous palliative care researcher KS
I'm reviewing grants for the National Palliative Care Research Center in New York, and always on the lookout for blog material.  I can't discuss any of the grants themselves, of course, but some interesting items came up at dinner tonight.

Now I love California, but New Yorkers do have a few things on the rest of the country - they walk everywhere, have great fashion sense, and are first to try the latest cool gadgets.

And perhaps there's a lesson here somewhere here about mobility and older adults.

Take shoes.

Most of the shoes I've seen for older adults are utilitarian and plain. What if shoes for older adults were really fashionable - like those modeled by famous palliative care researcher K.S. in the photograph above?  Ooh la la!  Would older adults feel better about walking?

Fuel watch from RK's son T√łnne
And in this picture we have a cool watch gadget that tracks daily "fuel" expenditure toward a set goal. (This watch belongs to the son of RK from ACS).  Would older adults feel better about themselves if they had a cool watch giving them feedback?

by: Alex Smith

Comments

Vineet Arora said…
I love the fuel band! i have a white one. i should add that im always on the hunt for good "OSHA shoes" - comfy fashionable shoes that are not open toed. -Vineet Arora
Anonymous said…
My 86 year old mother has some venous insuficiency and her ankles swell from time to time. Other than that, and in spite of her DJD, she is a very active vain woman who enjoys painting, writing and opera. However, it is the swelling of the ankles that causes her the most distress. My explanations that this is just a cosmetic issue insulted her. In retrospecrt, I agree. What if there were stockings that were fashionable or shoes that didn't remind her of her age? She is not an ostrich. she know how old she is and what her limitations are, but she is still very much enjoying her retirement and does not want to be treated like a little old lady.
Anonymous said…
Shoes as shown would be wonderful looking and immediately contribute to a fall. Is this much "style" really worth a broken hip???
Alex Smith said…
Vineet - not surprised you have the band. Being the high energy person you are, I suspect you expend more energy in an hour than I do in a week!

Second Anon - granted the shoes as shown are not practical enough for many older adults. But we can do better than the equipment that makes a person look like an "ostrich" (thanks for that image first Anon).

Popular posts from this blog

Practical Advice for the End of Life: A Podcast with BJ Miller

This week we talk with BJ Miller, hospice and palliative care physician, public speaker, and now author with Shoshana Berger of the book "A Beginner's Guide to the End."

As we note on the podcast, BJ is about as close as we get to a celebrity in Hospice and Palliative Care.  His TED Talk "What Really Matters at the End of Life" has been viewed more than 9 million times.  As we discuss on the Podcast, this has changed BJ's life, and he spends most of his working time engaged in public speaking, being the public "face" of the hospice and palliative care movement.

The book he and Berger wrote is filled to the brim with practical advice.  I mean, nuts and bolts practical advice.  Things like:
How to clean out not only your emotional house but your physical house (turns out there are services for that!)Posting about your illness on social media (should you post to Facebook)What is the difference between a funeral home and mortuaryCan I afford to die?  …

Improving Advance Care Planning for Latinos with Cancer: A Podcast with Fischer and Fink

In this week's GeriPal podcast we talk with Stacy Fischer, MD and Regina Fink, RN, PhD, both from the University of Colorado, about a lay health navigator intervention to improve advance care planning with Latinos with advanced cancer.  The issue of lay health navigators raises several issues that we discuss, including:
What is a lay health navigator?What do they do?  How are they trained?What do lay health navigators offer that specialized palliative care doesn't?  Are they replacing us?What makes the health navigator intervention particularly appropriate for Latinos and rural individuals?  For advance care planning? Eric and I had fun singing in French (yes French, not Spanish, listen to the podcast to learn why).
Enjoy! -@AlexSmithMD




You can also find us onYoutube!



Listen to GeriPal Podcasts on:
iTunes Google Play MusicSoundcloudStitcher

Transcript

Eric: Welcome to the GeriPal podcast. This is Eric Widera.

Alex: This is Alex Smith.

Eric: And Alex, I'm really excited about toda…

The Dangers of Fleet Enemas

The dangers of oral sodium phosphate preparations are fairly well known in the medical community. In 2006 the FDA issued it’s first warning that patients taking oral sodium phosphate preparations are at risk for potential for acute kidney injury. Two years later, over-the-counter preparations of these drugs were voluntarily withdrawn by the manufacturers.  Those agents still available by prescription were given black box warnings mainly due to acute phosphate nephropathy that can result in renal failure, especially in older adults. Despite all this talk of oral preparations, little was mentioned about a sodium phosphate preparation that is still available over-the-counter – the Fleet enema.

Why Oral Sodium Phosphate Preparations Are Dangerous 

Before we go into the risks of Fleet enemas, lets spend just a couple sentences on why oral sodium phosphate preparations carry significant risks. First, oral sodium phosphate preparations can cause significant fluid shifts within the colon …