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Honoring Nurses


National Nurses week begins on May 6, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the “founder of modern nursing”, and continues through May 12. The American Nursing Association can give you more information on the history of Nurses Week. And here’s a fact sheet on stats of licensed nurses in the United States and one on nurseaides/orderlies/attendants (in my opinion the unsung heroes of nursing).

Here’s the real message for the week:
No one, yup, no one in the US has not been impacted by the work of a nurse.  

Our job is to protect, promote, and optimize health, prevent illness and injury, alleviate suffering, care for the sick, disabled and dying.  We are bedside nurses, researchers, primary and specialty care providers, educators, clinic workers, care coordinators, discharge planners, managers, administrators, anesthetists, midwives, and more.  We make sure you have the right medicines, keep you clean and safe, change your diapers, dress your wounds, clean up your vomit, put in IV lines, nasal, gastric, urinary, and rectal tubes.  We work with high tech equipment and perform life saving measures on a daily basis. We hold your hand when you need comfort, sit with you in the night when you are scared, speak up for you when you cannot.  Your lives and the quality of your lives are in our hands.

We work in clinics, hospitals, urgent care, emergency departments, long-term care and assisted living facilities, private homes, urban and rural communities, schools, psychiatric facilities, camps, military facilities, and industries.  We are legal and insurance consultants. We help bring babies into the world; we make sure you die well.  We are the frontline.  We are behind the scenes.

This week I am reminded of the awe and pride I feel to be a part of this dedicated group of people called nurses.   

by: Patrice Villars

Comments

Laurie M said…
Hi,Great Article- just a quick correction--Florence Nightingale's birthday is May 12th not May 6th.
SPaireNP said…
As usual, Patrice, you nailed it! We've never met but I feel like I've known you for years by reading your submissions. Thanks for the beautifully written overview of our calling.No one could have said it better!

Please continue to put your voice out in these various op-eds, blogs, etc because you speak for so many of us!

Blessings,
SP

Heidi White, MD said…
What an incredible, indispensable, far reaching profession!
Janice Reynolds said…
While the column was excellent, a comment made the intro wasn't. I hope it was just mis-speak however while nurses' aides,orderlies, and attendants are wonderful and deffinately unsung, they are not the unsung heroes of nursing. Try unsung heros of health care but please don't suggest they are nurses.

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