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How do you teach about Prognostication?



Prognostication is one of the most challenging concepts; however, there are some good teaching tools to get you started!

A search of the Portal of Geriatric Online Education (POGOe) revealed some excellent resources: 

1. Educational Products related to more general geriatric palliative care topics (i.e. hospice, advance care planning):



2. Critically Appraised Papers which allow both learners and teachers to access these reviews and send them along via e-mail. For example, there is a review of the ADEPT versus Hospice Guidelines Article (REF: Mitchell SL, Miller SC, Teno JM, Kiely DK, Davis RB, Shaffer ML. Prediction of 6-month survival of nursing home residents with advanced dementia using ADEPT vs hospice eligibility guidelines. JAMA. 2010 Nov 3;304(17):1929-35.)

3. Interactive Websites like ePrognosis are included as well (see POGOe link here). This is another tool that GeriPal readers will be familiar with and has a five star rating. This site is designed for older adults who do not have a dominant terminal illness. For patients with a dominant terminal illness, such as advanced dementia, cancer, or heart failure. It is a rough guide to educate and inform clinicians about possible mortality outcomes.

There are many more great teaching resources out there, so please help us discuss and share those that you find helpful in the GeriPal comment section.

Wishing you all the best in your teaching adventures,

Amy M. Corcoran

Comments

What is RSD said…
Prognostication in geriatrics is well worth discussing. The same problem holds true in the understanding of pain. Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) (what is rsd?) is a disease not well known whose progression isn't well understood. Hopefully this post serves as a resource for those in geriatrics.

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Eric: Welcome to the GeriPal Podcast. This is Eric Widera.

Alex: This is Alex Smith.

Eric: Alex, I spy someone in our …