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The Thickened Liquid Challenge - #ThickenedLiquidChallenge




Our hospice and palliative care team decided this weekend to do the "Thickened Liquid Challenge.”  This is a simple challenge that is mainly focused on putting ourselves in the shoes of our patients who are prescribed thickened liquids (or perhaps I should say drink from their cups).

The rules are simple:
  • 12 Hour Challenge: All fluids must be thickened to “honey consistency” using a beverage thickener for a 12 hour contiguous period. Food does not have to be thickened.
  • Mini-challenge: drink an 8 ounce drink thickened to honey consistency (coffee, wine, juice, water, or any drink of your choice)
  • Videotape yourself and include an announcement that you accept the challenge
  • If you fail the challenge you must donate $20 to a geriatrics or palliative care charity of your choice (see notes below for some suggestions)
  • At the end of your challenge, nominate a minimum of three other people/teams to participate in the challenge. 
  • When posting the challenge online, please use the hashtag #thickenedliquidchallenge

We’ll spend some time on the next post about the data behind thickened liquids for individuals with dementia and other diseases where swallowing is an issue (spoiler alert: it’s not good, despite the fact that 8% of patients in skilled nursing facilities are taking thickened liquids).

by: Eric Widera (@ewidera)‬

Note: here are some good hospice, palliative care, and geriatrics charities to consider:

Geriatrics: 
Hospice and Palliative Care: 
Other notable organizations:

12 Hour Challenges Accepted (if you do a 12 hour challenge, we'll post it on GeriPal even if you don't finish):















Note: This post is part of the series on the #ThickenedLiquidChallenge.  To watch the videos of this challenge check out the videos on YouTube:

Comments

Anonymous said…
This sounds like a great opportunity to raise awareness of this important quality of life issue. Where online do you suggest we post the video? Thanks.
Eric Widera said…
It would be great if the videos are loaded up on YouTube so we can search for it by the hashtag #thickenedliquidchallenge. Just make sure when you upload it you tag it with #thickenedliquidchallenge.

Please also just drop a comment on this post with the URL (webpage link) to your video

Thanks
Anonymous said…
It is a chronic problem that medical staff wrinkle their noses at the very food and beverages they serve their patients. If we have an aversion to this treatment and if there is minimal evidence it will prevent pneumonia we should be considering alternatives. Why not try naturally thicker beverages. Beverages like chocolate milk, buttermilk, tomato juice, egg nog, smoothies, and creamed soups which are socially acceptable and enjoyable to consume. #thickenedliquidchallenge
Theresa Allison said…
Eureka Home Based Primary Care team is bringing the challenge to interprofessional teams across the country.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhah2NLMHgY&feature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2l-aQ85SSi0&feature=youtu.be
Great idea guys. I posted my reply at Pallimed here with a video as well to document my experience!

Here is the YouTube video.
Anonymous said…
Our CQI Team accepted your challenge! Some had never tried thickened liquids before. A great challenge to step in to our resident's shoes, if only for a moment.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6mXWKbXcwU
dcweas said…
The University of Utah Palliative Care Service has conquered the challenge!

http://youtu.be/h6g8_pY0IN8
Alex Smith said…
Love it Utah! Great star wars intro. I do believe Shaida resembles the emperor...

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