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Martin Shkreli (aka PalliBro) buys Palliative Care



by: Eric Widera (@ewidera) and Alex Smith (@AlexSmithMD)

In other merger and acquisition news today, palliative care was bought today by former hedge fund manager and current pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli (previously known as PharmaBro, now penned PalliBro).

Apparently Mr. Shkreli got the idea for the acquisition from Dr. Atul Gawande.  In his AAHPM/HPNA annual assembly plenary, Dr. Gawande noted that, "Palliative care has amazing outcomes.  If palliative care were a drug owned by the pharmaceutical industry, they would be mass marketing it and making billions."

Sources close to Shkreli state that he carefully pondered how much it could raise the price of this decades old intervention before buying it today. Overnight, the price per dose of palliative care increased by 525 percent, and there are further plans to increase the dose to what the market can bear.

Mr. Shkreli practically gloated about the potential profits in an email he sent out this morning:

“So 5,000 paying bottles of palliative care at the new price is $375,000,000 — almost all of it is profit and I think we will get three years of that or more. This should be a very handsome investment for all of us. Let’s all cross our fingers that the estimates are accurate.”

The pharmaceutical company behind Shkreli’ acquisition released a press statement to reply to potentional concerns of price gauging, stating “we set the drug price to balance patient access to our existing drugs with investment in research and value generation for our shareholders.”

Comments

This is morally wrong and corrupt. I'm extremely disappointed. It is a shame we in this country allow such greed at the expense of people who are not rich.
Thank you for this news and all the past excellent blogs. I expect the quality of your Geriatrics and Pallative News Blog to change and become worthless because I don't think they (PalliMed) will keep you guys on their payroll or will force you guys to change what you write.
Anonymous said…
This sounds like an April Fool post - how does one bottle Palliative Care?
Anonymous said…
Its an april fools joke. Hilarious haha
The Liz Army said…
Just reading this on April 4... You definitely had me at the first few lines. Thanks for the joke!

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While you're reading, I'll just go over and lick this toad.

-@AlexSmithMD





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Transcript
Eric: Welcome to the GeriPal Podcast. This is Eric Widera.

Alex: This is Alex Smith.

Eric: Alex, I spy someone in our …