Skip to main content

Who prescribes donepezil or memantine for dementia? Not Geriatricians from the Bronx...


by: Eric Widera (@ewidera)

There are two main drug classes use to treat Alzheimer's disease, cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) and the NMDA-antagonist memantine. Both have shown statistically significant improvements in outcomes for patients with AD, but the clinical significance of these benefits is marginal at best.   Furthermore, these benefits vary with disease severity, with ChEIs showing benefit from mild to servere dementia, and memantine showing benefit only in moderate to severe disease.

So how closely does clinical practice mirror the evidence behind these drugs?   A new study in JAGS suggests that your chances of being started on these drugs is about 50/50, and has less to do with FDA approved indications, and more to do with who you see and where you live.

The Study

The authors used a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare Part D from 2008 to 2010 and evaluated the frequency of ChEI’s and mematine prescription fills in people with a diagnosis of any type of dementia.  They compared individuals with similar disease severity based on a proxy of whether the participant lived in residential care. Because the measure may be imperfect in its correlation with dementia severity, drug use according to whether the participant died within a year of index diagnosis was also reported.  Information on visits to a neurologist, psychiatrist, or geriatrician in the 2 months before and after the date of the initial diagnosis was captured as an indicator of specialty involvement.

The Results

1. About half (56%) of all people with a dementia diagnosis receive either cholinesterase-inhibitors or memantine within a year of the index diagnosis.

2. There is no difference between use of ChEI or memantine related to the study’s proxy measure for dementia severity.   Furthermore, about half (45%) of those patients with dementia who died within 1 year of their index diagnosis were on one of these agents.

3. Factors not directly related to dementia, such as race and region of residence, influence treatment rates ChEI or memantine.    Turns out Bronx, NY, has the lowest rates of using them!

4. The type of clinician involved in care may independently influence whether a person is treated with ChEI or memantine.   Neurologists and psychiatrists are more likely and geriatricians less likely to prescribe ChEI’s and memantine than when primary care manages alone.


The Take Home

Apparently, if you don't want to be put on cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) or memantine, live in the Bronx and visit with a local geriatrician.  


Comments

Wonder Doc said…
So true. As a Geriatrician, I see these meds prescribed all the time for any stage or type of dementia. I usually explain to patients who see me for consultation that 'doctors like to fix things and you can't fix dementia; so they feel like they're doing something if they give you a prescription.' While, the education against the meds takes longer than most physicians have, I don't find that the limited benefits of the drugs are often clearly reviewed with or understood by these patients.

Popular posts from this blog

Practical Advice for the End of Life: A Podcast with BJ Miller

This week we talk with BJ Miller, hospice and palliative care physician, public speaker, and now author with Shoshana Berger of the book "A Beginner's Guide to the End."

As we note on the podcast, BJ is about as close as we get to a celebrity in Hospice and Palliative Care.  His TED Talk "What Really Matters at the End of Life" has been viewed more than 9 million times.  As we discuss on the Podcast, this has changed BJ's life, and he spends most of his working time engaged in public speaking, being the public "face" of the hospice and palliative care movement.

The book he and Berger wrote is filled to the brim with practical advice.  I mean, nuts and bolts practical advice.  Things like:
How to clean out not only your emotional house but your physical house (turns out there are services for that!)Posting about your illness on social media (should you post to Facebook)What is the difference between a funeral home and mortuaryCan I afford to die?  …

Improving Advance Care Planning for Latinos with Cancer: A Podcast with Fischer and Fink

In this week's GeriPal podcast we talk with Stacy Fischer, MD and Regina Fink, RN, PhD, both from the University of Colorado, about a lay health navigator intervention to improve advance care planning with Latinos with advanced cancer.  The issue of lay health navigators raises several issues that we discuss, including:
What is a lay health navigator?What do they do?  How are they trained?What do lay health navigators offer that specialized palliative care doesn't?  Are they replacing us?What makes the health navigator intervention particularly appropriate for Latinos and rural individuals?  For advance care planning? Eric and I had fun singing in French (yes French, not Spanish, listen to the podcast to learn why).
Enjoy! -@AlexSmithMD




You can also find us onYoutube!



Listen to GeriPal Podcasts on:
iTunes Google Play MusicSoundcloudStitcher

Transcript

Eric: Welcome to the GeriPal podcast. This is Eric Widera.

Alex: This is Alex Smith.

Eric: And Alex, I'm really excited about toda…

The Dangers of Fleet Enemas

The dangers of oral sodium phosphate preparations are fairly well known in the medical community. In 2006 the FDA issued it’s first warning that patients taking oral sodium phosphate preparations are at risk for potential for acute kidney injury. Two years later, over-the-counter preparations of these drugs were voluntarily withdrawn by the manufacturers.  Those agents still available by prescription were given black box warnings mainly due to acute phosphate nephropathy that can result in renal failure, especially in older adults. Despite all this talk of oral preparations, little was mentioned about a sodium phosphate preparation that is still available over-the-counter – the Fleet enema.

Why Oral Sodium Phosphate Preparations Are Dangerous 

Before we go into the risks of Fleet enemas, lets spend just a couple sentences on why oral sodium phosphate preparations carry significant risks. First, oral sodium phosphate preparations can cause significant fluid shifts within the colon …