Skip to main content

Songs that Inspire, Move, or Make Us Think about Geriatrics or Palliative Care



Back in 2009, Pallimed created one of my favorite podcast posts titled "Top 10 Contemporary Palliative Care Songs".  In it, they made a list of "contemporary" songs from many different genres that have palliative themes.   For todays podcast, we aim to update this list with songs that inspire, move, or make us think about geriatrics or palliative care.

As with the Pallimed post, this is all personal preference.   So we would love to hear from you.  What one song would you have included in this podcast if you were sitting in the studio?  Put it in the comments section of this post!



Listen to GeriPal Podcasts on:

by: Eric Widera (@ewidera)


------------------------------------------------------------------------

We don't have a transcript for the podcast today, but here is the list of songs picked by our studio audience:

Alex Smith: Dennis Kamakahi - Wahine 'Ilikea



Jen Olenik: Let It Be by the Penn Med Ultrasounds



Leah Witt: Legacy by JAY-Z 



Emily Taplin: Nick of Time by Bonnie Raitt



Kai RomeroFlorence + The Machine - Stand By Me (yes, not the Ben E King version)




Anne Kelly: 
Warren Zevon - Keep Me In Your Heart



Eric Widera:  I picked I Don't Want to Die in the Hospital from Conor Oberst and the Mystic Valley band.  I first heart it when I attended a great session at the 2008 AAHPM meeting titled Palliative Themes in Music: An Educational and Self-Care Exercise where I fell in love with it.

Comments

I can believe you guys missed "The Man in The Bed" by Dave Alvin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6mEHo_CnBQ Sad but well worth it and very California.
Unknown said…
"Old Friends" by Simon and Garfunkel

I also love, "I Don't Want to Die in the Hospital" by Connor Oberst.
Trish Rux said…
"The Wind" by Warren Zevon

"Broke Down Castle" The Grateful Dead
JOAN ROBINSON said…
Death Cab For Cutie-"I will follow you into the Dark"
@kathykastner said…
Swing lo, sweet chariot comes to mind.... But, in thinking of this, I cannot help but remember a long-ago interview I did with the late great Robin Williams, 'round the time of a stockmarket crash. With his spontaneous cleverness, he burst into song: "Swing low, sweet Dow Jones. Coming for to take away my home. ..look over yonder and what do I see (coming for to take away my home) Les Hinton coming after me, coming for to take away my home.
Lisa Morris said…
Recently heard Loudon Wainwright's "Homeless" about his grief after the death of his mother. It resonated with me as the anticipation of loss of a loved one undergirds so many of the palliative care conversations I'm involved in...
Anonymous said…
"How Can I Help You to Say Goodbye" by Patty Loveless
Sarah Leyde said…
Love is Stronger than Death by The The

Popular posts from this blog

Practical Advice for the End of Life: A Podcast with BJ Miller

This week we talk with BJ Miller, hospice and palliative care physician, public speaker, and now author with Shoshana Berger of the book "A Beginner's Guide to the End."

As we note on the podcast, BJ is about as close as we get to a celebrity in Hospice and Palliative Care.  His TED Talk "What Really Matters at the End of Life" has been viewed more than 9 million times.  As we discuss on the Podcast, this has changed BJ's life, and he spends most of his working time engaged in public speaking, being the public "face" of the hospice and palliative care movement.

The book he and Berger wrote is filled to the brim with practical advice.  I mean, nuts and bolts practical advice.  Things like:
How to clean out not only your emotional house but your physical house (turns out there are services for that!)Posting about your illness on social media (should you post to Facebook)What is the difference between a funeral home and mortuaryCan I afford to die?  …

Improving Advance Care Planning for Latinos with Cancer: A Podcast with Fischer and Fink

In this week's GeriPal podcast we talk with Stacy Fischer, MD and Regina Fink, RN, PhD, both from the University of Colorado, about a lay health navigator intervention to improve advance care planning with Latinos with advanced cancer.  The issue of lay health navigators raises several issues that we discuss, including:
What is a lay health navigator?What do they do?  How are they trained?What do lay health navigators offer that specialized palliative care doesn't?  Are they replacing us?What makes the health navigator intervention particularly appropriate for Latinos and rural individuals?  For advance care planning? Eric and I had fun singing in French (yes French, not Spanish, listen to the podcast to learn why).
Enjoy! -@AlexSmithMD




You can also find us onYoutube!



Listen to GeriPal Podcasts on:
iTunes Google Play MusicSoundcloudStitcher

Transcript

Eric: Welcome to the GeriPal podcast. This is Eric Widera.

Alex: This is Alex Smith.

Eric: And Alex, I'm really excited about toda…

The Dangers of Fleet Enemas

The dangers of oral sodium phosphate preparations are fairly well known in the medical community. In 2006 the FDA issued it’s first warning that patients taking oral sodium phosphate preparations are at risk for potential for acute kidney injury. Two years later, over-the-counter preparations of these drugs were voluntarily withdrawn by the manufacturers.  Those agents still available by prescription were given black box warnings mainly due to acute phosphate nephropathy that can result in renal failure, especially in older adults. Despite all this talk of oral preparations, little was mentioned about a sodium phosphate preparation that is still available over-the-counter – the Fleet enema.

Why Oral Sodium Phosphate Preparations Are Dangerous 

Before we go into the risks of Fleet enemas, lets spend just a couple sentences on why oral sodium phosphate preparations carry significant risks. First, oral sodium phosphate preparations can cause significant fluid shifts within the colon …