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Songs that Inspire, Move, or Make Us Think about Geriatrics or Palliative Care



Back in 2009, Pallimed created one of my favorite podcast posts titled "Top 10 Contemporary Palliative Care Songs".  In it, they made a list of "contemporary" songs from many different genres that have palliative themes.   For todays podcast, we aim to update this list with songs that inspire, move, or make us think about geriatrics or palliative care.

As with the Pallimed post, this is all personal preference.   So we would love to hear from you.  What one song would you have included in this podcast if you were sitting in the studio?  Put it in the comments section of this post!



Listen to GeriPal Podcasts on:

by: Eric Widera (@ewidera)


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We don't have a transcript for the podcast today, but here is the list of songs picked by our studio audience:

Alex Smith: Dennis Kamakahi - Wahine 'Ilikea



Jen Olenik: Let It Be by the Penn Med Ultrasounds



Leah Witt: Legacy by JAY-Z 



Emily Taplin: Nick of Time by Bonnie Raitt



Kai RomeroFlorence + The Machine - Stand By Me (yes, not the Ben E King version)




Anne Kelly: 
Warren Zevon - Keep Me In Your Heart



Eric Widera:  I picked I Don't Want to Die in the Hospital from Conor Oberst and the Mystic Valley band.  I first heart it when I attended a great session at the 2008 AAHPM meeting titled Palliative Themes in Music: An Educational and Self-Care Exercise where I fell in love with it.

Comments

I can believe you guys missed "The Man in The Bed" by Dave Alvin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6mEHo_CnBQ Sad but well worth it and very California.
Unknown said…
"Old Friends" by Simon and Garfunkel

I also love, "I Don't Want to Die in the Hospital" by Connor Oberst.
Trish Rux said…
"The Wind" by Warren Zevon

"Broke Down Castle" The Grateful Dead
JOAN ROBINSON said…
Death Cab For Cutie-"I will follow you into the Dark"
@kathykastner said…
Swing lo, sweet chariot comes to mind.... But, in thinking of this, I cannot help but remember a long-ago interview I did with the late great Robin Williams, 'round the time of a stockmarket crash. With his spontaneous cleverness, he burst into song: "Swing low, sweet Dow Jones. Coming for to take away my home. ..look over yonder and what do I see (coming for to take away my home) Les Hinton coming after me, coming for to take away my home.
Lisa Morris said…
Recently heard Loudon Wainwright's "Homeless" about his grief after the death of his mother. It resonated with me as the anticipation of loss of a loved one undergirds so many of the palliative care conversations I'm involved in...
Anonymous said…
"How Can I Help You to Say Goodbye" by Patty Loveless
Sarah Leyde said…
Love is Stronger than Death by The The

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