Skip to main content

Songs that Inspire, Move, or Make Us Think about Geriatrics or Palliative Care



Back in 2009, Pallimed created one of my favorite podcast posts titled "Top 10 Contemporary Palliative Care Songs".  In it, they made a list of "contemporary" songs from many different genres that have palliative themes.   For todays podcast, we aim to update this list with songs that inspire, move, or make us think about geriatrics or palliative care.

As with the Pallimed post, this is all personal preference.   So we would love to hear from you.  What one song would you have included in this podcast if you were sitting in the studio?  Put it in the comments section of this post!



Listen to GeriPal Podcasts on:

by: Eric Widera (@ewidera)


------------------------------------------------------------------------

We don't have a transcript for the podcast today, but here is the list of songs picked by our studio audience:

Alex Smith: Dennis Kamakahi - Wahine 'Ilikea



Jen Olenik: Let It Be by the Penn Med Ultrasounds



Leah Witt: Legacy by JAY-Z 



Emily Taplin: Nick of Time by Bonnie Raitt



Kai RomeroFlorence + The Machine - Stand By Me (yes, not the Ben E King version)




Anne Kelly: 
Warren Zevon - Keep Me In Your Heart



Eric Widera:  I picked I Don't Want to Die in the Hospital from Conor Oberst and the Mystic Valley band.  I first heart it when I attended a great session at the 2008 AAHPM meeting titled Palliative Themes in Music: An Educational and Self-Care Exercise where I fell in love with it.

Comments

I can believe you guys missed "The Man in The Bed" by Dave Alvin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6mEHo_CnBQ Sad but well worth it and very California.
Unknown said…
"Old Friends" by Simon and Garfunkel

I also love, "I Don't Want to Die in the Hospital" by Connor Oberst.
Trish Rux said…
"The Wind" by Warren Zevon

"Broke Down Castle" The Grateful Dead
JOAN ROBINSON said…
Death Cab For Cutie-"I will follow you into the Dark"
@kathykastner said…
Swing lo, sweet chariot comes to mind.... But, in thinking of this, I cannot help but remember a long-ago interview I did with the late great Robin Williams, 'round the time of a stockmarket crash. With his spontaneous cleverness, he burst into song: "Swing low, sweet Dow Jones. Coming for to take away my home. ..look over yonder and what do I see (coming for to take away my home) Les Hinton coming after me, coming for to take away my home.
Lisa Morris said…
Recently heard Loudon Wainwright's "Homeless" about his grief after the death of his mother. It resonated with me as the anticipation of loss of a loved one undergirds so many of the palliative care conversations I'm involved in...
Anonymous said…
"How Can I Help You to Say Goodbye" by Patty Loveless
Sarah Leyde said…
Love is Stronger than Death by The The

Popular posts from this blog

Lost in Translation: Google’s Translation of Palliative Care to ‘Do-Nothing Care’

by: Cynthia X. Pan, MD, FACP, AGSF (@Cxpan5X)

My colleagues often ask me: “Why are Chinese patients so resistant to hospice and palliative care?” “Why are they so unrealistic?” “Don’t they understand that death is part of life?” “Is it true that with Chinese patients you cannot discuss advance directives?”

As a Chinese speaking geriatrician and palliative care physician practicing in Flushing, NY, I have cared for countless Chinese patients with serious illnesses or at end of life.  Invariably, when Chinese patients or families see me, they ask me if I speak Chinese. When I reply “I do” in Mandarin, the relief and instant trust I see on their faces make my day meaningful and worthwhile.

At my hospital, the patient population is about 30% Asian, with the majority of these being Chinese. Most of these patients require language interpretation.  It becomes an interesting challenge and opportunity, as we often need to discuss advance directives, goals of care, and end of life care options…

Delirium: A podcast with Sharon Inouye

In this week's GeriPal podcast we discuss delirium, with a focus on prevention. We are joined by internationally acclaimed delirium researcher Sharon Inouye, MD, MPH. Dr Inouye is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Aging Brain Center in the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife.

Dr. Inouye's research focuses on delirium and functional decline in hospitalized older patients, resulting in more than 200 peer-reviewed original articles to date. She has developed and validated a widely used tool to identify delirium called the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), and she founded the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) to prevent delirium in hospitalized patients.

We are also joined by guest host Lindsey Haddock, MD, a geriatrics fellow at UCSF who asks a great question about how to implement a HELP program, or aspects of the program, in a hospital with limited resources.  


You can also find us on Youtube!


Listen to GeriPal Podcasts on:
iTunes…

Are Palliative Care Providers Better Prognosticators? A Podcast with Bob Gramling

Estimating prognosis is hard and clinicians get very little training on how to do it.  Maybe that is one of the reasons that clinicians are more likely to be optimistic and tend to overestimate patient survival by a factor of between 3 and 5.  The question is, aren't we better as palliative care clinicians than others in estimating prognosis?  This is part of our training and we do it daily.   We got to be better, right? 

Well, on todays podcast we have Bob Gramling from the Holly and Bob Miller Chair of Palliative Medicine at the University of Vermont to talk about his paper in Journal of Pain and Symptom Management (JPSM) titled “Palliative Care Clinician Overestimation of Survival in Advanced Cancer: Disparities and Association with End of Life Care”.

Big findings from this JPSM paper include that we, like all other clinicians, are an optimistic bunch and that it actually does impact outcomes.   In particular, the people whose survival was overestimated by a palliative care c…