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GeriPal needs YOUR feedback!

by: Alex Smith, @AlexSmithMD and Eric Widera, @EWidera

We at GeriPal have enjoyed blogging and podcasting with you.  Improving care of older adults with serious illness is the common cause that binds us together with you, dear GeriPal readers and podcast listeners.

We would like to know: how can we be better?

To that end, we've hired a consulting firm (Cambridge Analytica) that will gather survey information about your experiences with GeriPal and how it can be improved.  How can our writing be clearer?  Are the posts or podcasts too long?  Too short?  More or less singing?

Cambridge Analytica additionally collects a small amount of voting information that will be used purely for understanding who our audience is and how we can better serve you.  We care deeply about your privacy, so we asked Cambridge Analytica to double pinky promise to delete the data once we're done with it.

Here is the link to the survey, collected via Facebook (naturally): https://survey.fbapp.io/geripal-survey-by-cambridge-analytica

Thank you!
Alex & Eric


Comments

Anonymous said…
Do you actually think that anyone is going to do a survey powered by Cambridge Analytical? (Think politics!) No way.
Anonymous said…
This is a joke right? I deleted my FB account, because Cambridge Analytica.
Check the date, Anonymous. Ever heard of April Fools Day? (I thought this was brilliant, guys. I'm still laughing!)
Lindsey Yourman said…
More rapping, less singing
Theresa Allison said…
You should have @gerimuse join the podcast and sing “the dementia caregiving blues”!
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Mike Steinman said…
Alex is clearly in a rut with his song choices. Time to mix it up with some death metal (extra points for being topically appropriate).
Anonymous said…
Are you Crazy? Cambridge Analytica. That's a good joke. He,He, He.
Anonymous said…
Yes, Marty Tousley, I HAVE heard of April's Fool.

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