Skip to main content

Nip/tuck GeriPal Style: A New Year, A New Look


It has been a little over a year and a half since we started GeriPal.  In that time our little community has expanded quite dramatically.  Just in the last year we have had close to 100,000 views of our website with nearly the same number of views through our feed service.   Who would have thought that there were that many people interested in geriatrics and palliative care???

With all that wear and tear, GeriPal looked like it needed a little freshening up.  So, over the last several weeks we have rolled out a new logo, a new website design, updated our facebook page, and tweaked our twitter page.  I encourage everyone to check out these new redesigned sites:


Don't forget when you are on these sites to either friend us, like us, or follow us.  Also, please give us feedback on the changes.  Did we forget something that you think we should add?  Are you having problems loading the site on your computer?  Are you getting our emails ok?

Lastly, here is a recap of the top 10 posts of 2010 in no particular order:



Thanks for a great year and here is to more great things in 2011!

by: Eric Widera (twitter - @ewidera)

Comments

Jan Henderson said…
Congratulations on your well-deserved success. The Nip/Tuck job on your site looks great.
Don't forget about your iPhone app too. I like to get my GeriPal wherever I am! The site looks great. I am slightly jealous since my redesign got stuck in programming last year. My new resolution is to have a major overhaul by AAHPM in Feb.

Love the logo.

Popular posts from this blog

Lost in Translation: Google’s Translation of Palliative Care to ‘Do-Nothing Care’

by: Cynthia X. Pan, MD, FACP, AGSF (@Cxpan5X)

My colleagues often ask me: “Why are Chinese patients so resistant to hospice and palliative care?” “Why are they so unrealistic?” “Don’t they understand that death is part of life?” “Is it true that with Chinese patients you cannot discuss advance directives?”

As a Chinese speaking geriatrician and palliative care physician practicing in Flushing, NY, I have cared for countless Chinese patients with serious illnesses or at end of life.  Invariably, when Chinese patients or families see me, they ask me if I speak Chinese. When I reply “I do” in Mandarin, the relief and instant trust I see on their faces make my day meaningful and worthwhile.

At my hospital, the patient population is about 30% Asian, with the majority of these being Chinese. Most of these patients require language interpretation.  It becomes an interesting challenge and opportunity, as we often need to discuss advance directives, goals of care, and end of life care options…

Elderhood: Podcast with Louise Aronson

In this week's podcast we talk with Louise Aronson MD, MFA, Professor of Geriatrics at UCSF about her new book Elderhood, available for purchase now for delivery on the release date June 11th.

We are one of the first to interview Louise, as she has interviews scheduled with other lesser media outlets to follow (CBS This Morning and Fresh Air with Terry...somebody).

This book is tremendously rich, covering a history of aging/geriatrics, Louise's own journey as a geriatrician facing burnout, aging and death of family of Louise's members, insightful stories of patients, and more.

We focus therefore on the 3 main things we think our listeners and readers will be interested in.

First - why the word "Elder" and "Elderhood" when JAGS/AGS and others recently decided that the preferred terminology was "older adult"?

Second - Robert Butler coined the term ageism in 1969 - where do we see ageism in contemporary writing/thinking?  We focus on Louise's…

The Dangers of Fleet Enemas

The dangers of oral sodium phosphate preparations are fairly well known in the medical community. In 2006 the FDA issued it’s first warning that patients taking oral sodium phosphate preparations are at risk for potential for acute kidney injury. Two years later, over-the-counter preparations of these drugs were voluntarily withdrawn by the manufacturers.  Those agents still available by prescription were given black box warnings mainly due to acute phosphate nephropathy that can result in renal failure, especially in older adults. Despite all this talk of oral preparations, little was mentioned about a sodium phosphate preparation that is still available over-the-counter – the Fleet enema.

Why Oral Sodium Phosphate Preparations Are Dangerous 

Before we go into the risks of Fleet enemas, lets spend just a couple sentences on why oral sodium phosphate preparations carry significant risks. First, oral sodium phosphate preparations can cause significant fluid shifts within the colon …